Axel Schmiegelow

There’s something rotten in the Kingdom of Venture Capital

It’s generally a bad idea to generalize….(pun intended).

 

And criticizing VCs when you are in the process of fund raising is probably a bad idea and puts whatever you say at risk of being perceived as whining.

 

But having raised an excellent early stage round from some of the best Angel Investors and Entrepreneurs that I know, I cannot help but reflect on the contrast between the approach of the Angel Investors we have on board compared to the process and decision making that we – and others – experience with insitutional VCs.

 

The cliché of Venture Capital investments is that Angel Investors invest on a hunch, whereas insitutional VCs follow a more rational, risk-balanced and professional process.

 

Our experience has been that the really good, tough questions have been asked in detail by our Angels – to skim just the top of these questions:

- explain your metrics?

- what is the margin of error of your financial model?

- how do expect to scale?

- how much do you get out of a dollar spent?

- how big is your adressable market?

- what is your competitive moat (Buffet terminology)

- what are the strengths of your team, what do you need movong forward?

 

Too often, these were not the questions asked by VCs. It may be that in today’s market, they simply don’t have the time to parse their deal flow in depth and instead rely on market consensus that this or that startup is “hot”. This leads to herd investing, and that may explain the disappointment of portfolios largely kept alive by follow-on rounds and convenient “exits” to friend VCs portfolio companies. It even makes sense, in a way, by “pooling resources” – if, that is, the VC initially triggering the herd did actually ask and answer the hard questions.

 

What it does not do is create an environment for the type of long shot value creation that Silicon Valley excels at. Ueber, AirBnB, Twitter, Quora would not have stood a chance with how many European VCs – obviously not all – approach their deal flow.

 

Add to that the rituals of pitching, event networking, and buzzword-slinging that are endemic, and it makes you wonder whether these VCs really are following the right path to identify truly ambitious startups correctly. Today’s hot startup often gets caught up tomorrow in business model issues that were recognizable from the outset. I sometime miss an analytical response and understanding of the market, at least from VCs that do not have an industry focus.

 

It’s hard to picture a barefoot Steve Jobs convincing any of today’s European VCs to invest in Apple.

 

 

the Hamlet VC

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